Assam

Thirty Three Koti Divinities

A popular but unfounded belief has been spread that Hindus have thirty-three crore (33,00,00,000) gods. It is a misunderstanding of the Vedic concept of the State, and hence a misinterpretation of the word koti. Thirty-three divinities are mentioned in the Yajur-Veda, Atharva Veda, áatapatha-Brāhmana and in other Vedic and later texts. The number thirty-three occurs with reference to divinities in the Parsi scriptures of Avesta as well.

Marriage Rituals and Customs in the Jain Community

In Jaina tradition, as in all Indian communities, marriage is a community event as not only two individuals, but two families are united. Until, and sometimes after, marriage, children generally live with their parents, and it is the parents’ responsibility to introduce them [perhaps with the help of suitable intermediaries] to prospective marriage partners. It is quite misleading to refer to this as arranged marriage – in practice, the couple has every opportunity over a long period to get to know each other, and the decision to marry belongs to them alone.

Reflection of the Rāmāyana in the Marriage Songs of Assam, Bengal and Orissa

The epic tradition of India upholds an ideal tradition of Indian culture, assimilating the folk culture in it. India is a country of different communities, languages and cultural groups. Inspite of all the diversities it has a basic cultural unity. This unity is cemented firmly by the great epics like the Rāmāyana and the Mahābhārata. The Rāmāya¸a remains a perennial source of social functions on the cultural life of India.

The Hindu Marriage Tradition in Assam:Change and Continuity

Birth, marriage and death are the three pillars of human life and existence. Of these, marriage is a social convention. In the Indian context, marriage has a religious and cultural background associated with it. The Hindus of Assam too have, since ancient times, regarded marriage as an essential responsibility. Therefore it has a distinct tradition of its own and a gamut of customs and rites are intertwined with the ceremony of  marriage.

Tribal Studies: Search for the Common Thread of Unity

The micro data of different communities of India –its castes and tribes – if put together and viewed in macro frame-work often leads us to the threads of unity. The apparent diversity, the cultural plurality gives way to commonality of cultural elements, our cultural continuum. Our approach brings a lot of difference – the approach whether we want to emphasize the diversity or intend to search the basic materials of culture, the permutation and combination of which make the difference.

Underlying Bond of Unity: Some Aspects of the Rabhas and the Garos

Rabhas are one of the largest communities of northeast India and spread throughout Assam, Meghalaya and West Bengal and also some parts of Bangladesh. Claimed themselves as origin from Tibeto-Burman linguistics stocks, the Rabhas inherited one of the richest socio-cultural trends. They are sub-divided into Rongdani, Pati, Maitori, Bilotia, Hana, Chunga, Totla, Dahori etc.